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Well and Good: A Better Kind of Coconut Oil

Coconut oil has been called the world’s healthiest oil, and it’s long been a staple ingredient of both food and medicine in tropical nations around the world.

But here, coconut oil has often gotten a bad rap as being bad for cholesterol. And, yes, the naysayers would be right if they were talking about the hydrogenated coconut oil found in many processed foods.

However, I am talking about pure, extra virgin, organic coconut oil.

The benefits of this oil are pretty extensive. Consuming the “right” kind of coconut oil is linked to stress relief, maintaining cholesterol levels, weight loss, increased immunity and a better metabolism.

No wonder the coconut palm is often called the “tree of life.”

Coconut oil contains about 50% lauric acid. The body converts this component to monolaurin, which can help strengthen the immune system.  Lauric acid, as well as capric acid and caprylic acid (which are also found in coconut oil) have anti-fungal, anti-bacterial and antiviral properties.

According to the Coconut Research Center, coconut oil helps kill viruses that cause influenza, measles, hepatitis, and herpes, plus bacterias that cause ulcers, throat infections and uterine tract infections.

Finally, coconut oil contains fewer calories than other vegetable oils, and its fat does not lead to fat accumulation in the heart or arteries.

The company Barlean’s gets its coconut oil from the Quezon province in the Philippines, where plantation farmers and their families harvest the product. Every coconut is hand-selected; no immature coconuts or those that have fallen to the ground are used. The coconuts have also been certified organic by the USDA.

One final thought: Coconut oil is easy to incorporate into the diet. I use it in stir-fries for that tropical flavor.  You can also substitute it for butter, whether on a bagel or when baking muffins, cookies or cakes.  Use your imagination for your own FRESH ideas.

Coconut oil has been called the world’s healthiest oil, and it’s long been a staple ingredient of both food and medicine in tropical nations around the world.

But here, coconut oil has often gotten a bad rap as being bad for cholesterol. And, yes, the naysayers would be right if they were talking about the hydrogenated coconut oil found in many processed foods.

However, I am talking about pure, extra virgin, organic coconut oil.

The benefits of this oil are pretty extensive. Consuming the “right” kind of coconut oil is linked to stress relief, maintaining cholesterol levels, weight loss, increased immunity and a better metabolism.

No wonder the coconut palm is often called the “tree of life.”

Coconut oil contains about 50% lauric acid. The body converts this component to monolaurin, which can help strengthen the immune system. Lauric acid, as well as capric acid and caprylic acid (which are also found in coconut oil) have anti-fungal, anti-bacterial and antiviral properties.

According to the Coconut Research Center, coconut oil helps kill viruses that cause influenza, measles, hepatitis, and herpes, plus bacterias that cause ulcers, throat infections and uterine tract infections.

Finally, coconut oil contains fewer calories than other vegetable oils, and its fat does not lead to fat accumulation in the heart or arteries.

The company Barlean’s gets its coconut oil from the Quezon province in the Philippines, where plantation farmers and their families harvest the product. Every coconut is hand-selected; no immature coconuts or those that have fallen to the ground are used. The coconuts have also been certified organic by the USDA.

One final thought: Coconut oil is easy to incorporate into the diet. I use it in stir-fries for that tropical flavor. You can also substitute it for butter, whether on a bagel or when baking muffins, cookies or cakes. Use your imagination for your own FRESH ideas.